On Page SEO Checker Tool



Notable Issues Notable Issues Worth Reviewing Worth Reviewing Correct (or are they?) Correct (or are they?)



About On Page SEO Checker Tool

The on page SEO checker tool is a tool that scans the web pages for technical errors and SEO problems that can have an unfavorable effect on search engine rankings. On page SEO checker tool will give a comprehensive list of SEO mistakes found on your web pages and find out where you still have a chance to enhance your web page. On page SEO is very important to rank your web page in search results. Here is a list of what this on page SEO tool will scan of your web pages.

Meta Information

  • Title Tag – In the past, the title tag was considered the single most important “on page” ranking factor there was. Since 2012, Google has often shown something other than you might prefer, but the general concepts remain the same. It usually is shown as the “headline” in your search rankings and will help determine whether a viewer will click on your result or not. As of spring 2014, Google changed the font size, so now you should keep the character length to about 55 or so to prevent it from getting cut off. The title tag also shows in the blue bar at the very top of your browser window, but it does not actually show “on page”.
  • Description Tag – The description tag is what the visitor will read in the search results when deciding whether or not to click on your listing. While not necessarily a “ranking factor”, it should be unique for each page and written as a “classified ad” of up to 160 characters to compel users to click that result. the description tag should be relevant to that specific page, which is why Google Webmaster Tools points it out when you have duplicates.
  • Keyword Tag – The keyword meta tag is NO LONGER a critical factor for ranking. HOWEVER, it’s been left here because I do prefer it to stand out, and I do continue to use them.
  • H1 Header Tag – The H1 tag should often closely resemble your title tag, since it’s the headline for the page. If your headline isn’t visible and relevant, then how is anybody supposed to know what your page is about?
  • H2 Header Tag – If you have a page long enough for multiple headlines, then using them can add some more clearly defined relevance to your page. You do want to be sure you’re only using ONE H1 tag, but you can use multiple sub-headlines and even bullet points all you like. For their secondary headlines, some people prefer to use “bolded” text instead of actual H2 tags, H3, H4, etc, and thats fine. There’s no known advantage to using one over the other.
  • Image Height & Width Tags – Specifying the height and width attributes for images makes pages load faster, leaving space for the images to fill in as they completely download. Failure to add them forces everything to stop while the image renders, slowing the overall page load time, which can decrease the frequency and depth of your crawls by the search spiders.
  • Images Expire Headers – If you use “image expires” in your header, then browsers will cache the images until a specified date, speeding your load times for returning visitors. While this may not be directly relevant to search ranking, it does wonders for the sanity of your return visitors.
  • Robots Meta Tag – The Robots Meta Tag is a command issued to visiting search spiders.

Miscellaneous:

  • Robots.txt – The robots.txt file MUST be present on your domain, or you’re going to generate 404 errors when the search engines look for it. The robots.txt file also helps you steer the search engines away from areas you don’t want to index. Also, the robots.txt file is where you need to reference the location of your sitemap.xml file, and you can see Robots.org for more information.
  • XML sitemap file – XML sitemaps tell the search engines exactly where every page on your site is located, and the importance you place on each.
  • Local – Google Earth KML file – A business with a physical location needs one of these Keyhole Markup Language files, which can help Google determine your precise location.
  • rel=”canonical” Tag – The rel=canonical tag is used to tell the search engines what you want to be the “real” URL for a page, keeping them from indexing multiple versions of the same page. For example, if a blog post is in multiple categories, it may be accessible multiple URLs. Using a single canonical tag keeps just one version in the SERPs.
  • Canonical www – The search engines DO see subdomains (including www.) as entirely separate domains, and it’s up to you to ensure that all incoming requests get 301 redirected to the www version to prevent possible duplicate content issue. Furthermore, the search engines see varying versions of pages with different URL’s as duplicates too. Keep in mind that this tool ONLY checks a single URL for the www issue, so if your home page loads both with and without /index.html then you still may have a problem.
  • Nested Tables – Pages that contain tables inside other tables make the page load slower, since the web browser is forced to find the end of the table before it can display the whole page.
  • Inline Styles – In-line styles or CSS styles are those which are applied to just one single element. Using an external CSS style sheet will lead to overall smaller code, which means faster page loading, happier visitors, and likely, higher search rankings.
  • Inline Javascript – Having too much code in a page makes it load more slowly. Instead of placing code in-line, move it to an external file that you can then call as an include to speed it up.
  • Favicon – Favicons are the branded logos/icons that appear in the address bar next to your URL. This helps brand your company, and it makes it easier for users to return to your site from among a list of bookmarks, or from the browser tab. Using one is a good idea.
  • Favicon Method – To show a favicon, some sites just drop in an .ico file and let Web browsers find it on their own. Instead, there’s code that should can, and should be put in your header.

Image attributes

  • ALT Tags for Images – The ALT tag was originally designed to help sight impaired visitors “see” what an image was. With the addition of Google’s Universal search, ALT tags for key images will help your site appear more often in the search results.

Links

  • Anchor Text – These are the words that you’re using on this page to link to other pages. Even though Google changed the rules a bit in early 2012, for ranking purposes, they should still be directly relevant to your landing page. Wherever possible, link with relevant phrases throughout your website, but don’t make it sound ridiculous and unnatural.
  • Internal Links – These are links that point to other pages within your own domain. Whether internal or external, it’s typically a good idea to keep the numbers down, and I prefer to usually keep less than 30.
  • External Links – External links are those that point to other domains. Referencing other websites is great, and can help establish your own authority, but having too many links of any type can mean bad news because you’ll leak away too much of your link juise (i.e. PageRank) . Unless this is a resource page, having any more than 20 external links is just ridiculous, and you do run the risk of being labeled as a “link farm” too. Is there a logical reason to list so many links here other than your own? If so, then okay – great – I mean, what can you expect from an automated tool, anyway?

Compression

  • Total Page Size – Google has a great online tool showing developers how to speed up websites, called Page Speed Online and you can expect things like the page speed to matter more and more in the coming years. Maintaining a total page size of under 400k is a good idea for the speed of loading, and the individual object sizes can be seen below.
  • HTML Size – This is the size of all code on your web page EXCEPT…1. External JavaScript 2. Images 3. Your CSS files Typically, this by itself should be under 25k.
  • HTML Compression Status – Compressed pages load faster, and your users (and the search engines) will thank you for compressing them before delivery. If you’re managing your own Apache server, have the admin get you the Apache module called Apache module installed for zipping called mod_Gzip.
  • Compression Ratio – Some servers will compress the files before serving them to your visitors, making them load faster. This certainly isn’t critical, but the more competitive your environment, the more these little things can add up, so you may want to compress.
  • x-cache Header – This shows whether or not your site is serving cached pages. Caching saves bandwidth and speeds up load times by serving static versions of your dynamic pages.

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